After Record Transfer, The Waist Of Higuain Has Juve Worried

ROME (AP) — With Serie A Place to start Saturday Using Roma hosting Udinese and five-time defending champion Juventus Confronting Fiorentina, here are a few things to know about the Italian league:

___

HIGUAIN’S WAISTLINE: Gonzalo Higuain showed up overweight at his training session with Juventus After becoming the transfer in Italian football history.

Trimming his frame down, Higuain is not expected to start against Fiorentina and won’t be after the break for team play in early September until in form for a whole 90 minutes.

Higuain moved from rival Napoli for 90 million euros ($99 million) after scoring 36 goals last season to break a 66-year-old Serie A record for goals in a single season.

Juventus covered its investment in Higuain by transferring Paul Pogba back to Manchester United for a world-record fee of 105 million euros ($116 million).

Bidding to become the first club to win Serie A six consecutive occasions, Juventus’ signings include winger Dani Alves out of Barcelona, playmaker Miralem Pjanic out of Roma and shield Medhi Benatia out of Bayern Munich.

Another addition for Your Bianconeri is Croatia winger Marco Pjaca from Dinamo Zagreb.

The Gazzetta dello Sport on Friday projected Pjaca to become the league’s best player.

Still another young player, 22-year-old Paulo Dybala, previously starred by scoring 19 goals last season for Juventus. With Higuain an option he’s expected to match against Fiorentina.

___

AC MILAN TAKEOVER: Since AC Milan endures a third season it’s ambitions of an entire overhaul stay on hold as Silvio Berlusconi finishes a deal to market the club to investors.

Earlier this month, Berlusconi’s investment arm Fininvest reached a preliminary agreement to sell his entire bulk stake in the seven-time European winner he has owned for 30 years.

The deal with a Chinese investor group, which includes the participation of a Chinese country investment fund, worth the club at 740 million euros (around $820 million) and requires that the investors to spend 350 million euros over three years on improvements.

The deal, to be finalized at the end of the calendar year, comes after retail giant Suning bought a majority 70-percent stake in rival Inter Milan.

Milan finished seventh last year.

___

SURPRISING SASSUOLO: Sassuolo was the surprise of the league last season with a sixth-place finish that included a victory.

One of those few Serie A teams featuring a virtually all-Italian squad, Sassuolo built on this success by beating Swiss side Luzern on 4-1 aggregate at the third qualifying round of the Europa League, then finishing out Red Star Belgrade 3-0 in the first leg of the playoffs on Thursday.

On the other hand, the club from Modena might need to overcome two key players’ departures with forwards Nicola Sansone offered to Villarreal and defender Sime Vrsaljko.

Forward Alessandro Matri joined the club and will discuss the duties with 22-year-old Domenico Berardi, who had been signed from Juventus and is regarded as one of Italy’s best young strikers.

Berardi, who scored all four goals in a 4-3 win over Milan in 2014 scored the opener against Belgrade, giving him four goals in three.

___

ROSSI’S RETURN: Former Italy forward Giuseppe Rossi is back with Fiorentina after a loan stint with Spanish club Levante for the second half of last season.

The United States-born striker discovered playing time. He seems to have more of a chance after Nikola Kalinic struggled for goals during the latter part of last year with all the Viola.

Rossi scored six goals using Levante, which finished in the Liga.

Fiorentina finished last season and coach Paulo Sousa’s side is going to be put into the test away to Juventus.

___

Andrew Dampf on Twitter: www.twitter.com/asdampf

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Military Data Shows Problem, And It Is Getting Worse

SPRINGFIELD, Va. –  It’s not exactly clear why America’s military personnel are becoming fatter. May be that 15 decades of war have weakened the focus on fitness. Could be that millennials, with their penchant for activities such as some time and playing video games on networking, aren’t always up to the rigors of army life. Could be all of the burgers, pies, cakes and fries served in chow halls all over the world.
And also, the army is reflecting the nation population, whose the alarming increase obesity prices are being fueled by poor eating habits.
This is clear, though: Today’s army is fatter than ever.
For the first time in years, the Pentagon has disclosed information indicating the amount of troops its deems overweight, raising questions about readiness, fitness and the health of the force.
About 7.8 percent of the military — approximately one in every 13 soldiers — is clinically overweight, defined by a body mass-index over 25.   This rate has crept up since 2001, when it was only 1.6 percent, or one in 60, according to Defense Department data acquired by Military Times. And it’s highest among older service members, blacks, Hispanics and women.

In comparison with all the U.S. civilian population, the rate of overweight troops is far smaller. About 70% of the adult American population is clinically overweight or obese, according to information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.
Defense Department health officials released the data from the Military Times after multiple requests. They didn’t provide data to show the rate of troops that are obese specifically within Navy, the Army, Air Force and Marine Corps.

Battle troops are becoming fatter. On average are not as likely to be obese since the force in the large. Back in 2001, only around 1 in every 100 service members assigned to combat livelihood fields that were arms was flagged to be obese. It’s about one in 15.

This disclosure comes at a time when Pentagon health officials are rewriting forcewide guidelines for body composition standards for officially assessing it, and the methods. For troops, a diagnosis contribute to separation or of obesity may stall a career, so these coverages are central to army life.

Some Pentagon officials say the mounting signs of obesity are nothing to be worried about.   Still others state obesity may be a life-and-death issue on the battlefield. Troops may not proceed as quickly making them easier targets. And if they’re wounded, it is challenging for their buddies to pull them.

“If I have to climb up to the top of a mountain in Nuristan, in Afghanistan, and if I have somebody who is classified as clinically obese, they are possibly going to be a liability for me on this patrol,” said Army Command Sgt. Maj. John Troxell, the army’s top noncommissioned officer and the senior enlisted advisor to Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford.  

Troxell said the force of today is ready, but he believes the trends demand consideration and are upsetting.

“I don’t think it’s a clear openness concern at the moment.   However, I think it. And we really have to look across our solutions in what we’re doing daily or every day to prepare the men and women for what might be the worst day of the life,” Troxell said in a recent meeting.

Top Pentagon health officials say the increase is nothing. Dr. Terry Adirim, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for health services policy and oversight, suggested there could, in actuality, be no real growth in obesity. She called it a “quote-unquote increase” and said that the data may just reflect that army physicians are more mindful of obesity and for that reason flagging it frequently in official health records.

“A physician who’s now more aware about nutrition and fitness, they may be diagnosing it over previous years. … You can not tell from these numbers precisely what it is that is accounting for these apparent increases,” Adirim explained.
The obesity data is derived for physical fitness assessments from medical documents, not the until-level analyzing of the functional force.   Adirim emphasized comparisons to the population to the far higher obesity rates and rejected any concerns. “I am not concerned about these numbers representing problems with openness or fitness,” she explained. “In fact, I feel great that our military service members are well below the general populace when it comes to BMI measurement that are overweight and fat.”
Health officials caution against placing too much focus in human anatomy scores, which evaluate an individual’s height and weight to flag individuals who might have unhealthy levels of body fat.

The BMI measurement can be called a blunt instrument that erroneously defines body builders with heavy muscle mass as being obese, and misses flabby and unfit men and women who have been possess lanky body types.  
“You cannot extrapolate directly to state, because a BMI may be higher, that individual subsequently is unhealthy and therefore they will not be prepared for battle,” said Dr. Donald Shell, the Pentagon’s director of Disease Prevention, Disease Management and Population Health Policy and Oversight office.

The latest Pentagon obesity info validates concerns raised by “Mission: Preparation,” a nonprofit group of over 600 retired military officers that work to strengthen national security by advocating for kids nationally to have great schools and good eating habits.   Obesity is atop the schedule of the group. Studies indicate that about 70 percent of adolescents aren’t qualified for military service, and failure is a leading cause.

“This is about the national security of the United States,” said retired Army Lt. Gen. John Bednarek, who had been the highest ranking American general in Iraq at 2014. “it is a long term trend and we can’t turn a blind eye.   The main point is that our commanders and senior leaders need to have a peek at what we are serving, whether it’s at the [dining facility] or aboard a boat in the mess.   Are we providing healthy choices? Are we providing fruits and vegetable options up front? Rather than the first thing they see in the morning is that the grill using a 22-grams-of-fat sausage patty?”

New Coverage in the Functions  

The BMI metric is a key dilemma for the Pentagon’s current review of its forcewide body composition policy, the first time in 14 years that officials’ve rewritten these rules.
For troops, the official assessment of body composition begins with the BMI test to find out whether their height and weight remain healthy. If a fantastic BMI is shown by troops, they pass the body composition evaluation. Should they fail, they must undergo a much more complete “tape test” to estimate actual body fat percentage.
The policy requires service members to maintain body fat levels below a key threshold — 28 percent for men and 36 per cent for girls. And for years the Pentagon has demanded the services to apply that using a notoriously low-tech “tape evaluation.” Failure is often recorded in official personnel records and may impact advertising prospects. Failures could result in involuntary separation.

Many troops are critical of the BMI and the tape tests, which could punish people with specific body types.

Top military health plan to release a new policy this year that may have a sweeping impact on the military defines and measures wellness and exercise.

Bills’ Karlos Williams Blames Offseason Troubles On Himself

PITTSFORD, N.Y. (AP) — Out of contour and preparing to serve a four-game suspension, Buffalo Bills running back Karlos Williams is apologetic when bluntly assessing the fix he’s put himself in.

“I am very disappointed in myself. I put the organization, my teammates, my family in a very terrible situation,” he stated, upon reporting for the start of training camp this weekend.

“I only can learn from my mistakes this offseason and get ready to get back in shape, get ready to play soccer, and just can move forward.”

There is no point looking back in an offseason that went from bad to worse to Williams, who made a substantial contribution to Buffalo’s NFL-leading rushing attack for a rookie last year.

“You can’t change what happened,” he said. “All you can do is work, work , work and get ready to play football.”

He has plenty of time to put into shape. Besides the suspension, Williams isn’t cleared for training and is taking part in conditioning exercises while opening camp around the active/non-football illness list.

The trouble began in June, when concerns were raised by him by showing up obese for a three-day mandatory minicamp. Williams blamed the extra majority on being empathetic to his fiance’ and not wanting her to snack independently during her pregnancy.

Though it was not made clear how overweight Williams was, coach Rex Ryan joked that the participant may be a candidate for Lap-Band operation.

No one was laughing a few weeks when the NFL announced Williams’ four-game suspension for violating the league’s substance abuse policy.

The 23-year-old Williams chalked it up to being “a young kid, and only making bad choices, not thinking things through.”

Year his stumbles happened as fast as his ascension.

When he was drafted by Buffalo in the fifth round out of Florida State Williams was considered a project. At 6-foot-1 and 230 pounds, he had the blend of speed and size to play back. What he lacked was experience at the position after making the change from safety.

Williams immediately dispelled any queries by becoming the second NFL player to score touchdowns in his first six games — and at a time when rookie LeSean McCoy was hampered by a hamstring injury.

With a powerful running fashion, Williams scored three TDs rushing and another before missing three with a 27, getting.

Then he returned to score two rushing and another getting in his next two matches, and finished with 517 yards rushing, 96 receiving and nine touchdowns (seven rushing and two receiving) in 11 games.

The question is what job Williams will have once he’s eligible to return in Week 5.

General director Doug Whaley supplied no guarantees.

“He’s a young guy and he’s got to realize that everybody that comes into this building or into camp is competing for playing time and cap space,” Whaley said. “He is supporting the 8-ball right now. And I think he’s more disappointed than we are.”

The Adventures have depth at running back, starting with Mike Gillislee, who played a complementary role in closing last season. Buffalo additionally re-signed Boom Herron and additional James Wilder Jr., the son of former Buccaneers fullback James Wilder.

Then there’s fifth-round pick Jonathan Williams, who faces discipline after being detained in Arkansas on a misdemeanor charge of driving while drunk.

Karlos Williams’ primary concern is getting back on the field.

“I can restrain me, and all I could control right now has been in form,” Williams said. “It’s all about showing people, showing my loved ones, showing my friends, the possession, my coaches, my teammates and undoubtedly earning my teammates’ trust”

___

AP NFL websites: http://pro32.ap.org and http://twitter.com/AP_NFL

Military Data Shows Obesity Problem, And It’s Getting Worse

SPRINGFIELD, Va. –  It isn’t exactly clear why America’s military personnel are getting fatter. May be that the focus on fitness has weakened. Could be that millennials, with their penchant for sedentary activities like playing video games and killing some time on social media, aren’t necessarily up to the rigors of army life. Could be all of the burgers, fries, cakes and pies served in chow halls across the world.
And maybe, too, the army is simply reflecting the nation’s wider population, whose poor eating habits are fueling the alarming rise obesity rates.
This much is clear, though: Today’s military is fatter than ever before.
For the first time in years, the Pentagon has revealed data indicating the amount of troops its deems overweight, raising big questions about the health, fitness and readiness of today’s force.
Approximately 7.8 percent of the military — approximately one in every 13 soldiers — is clinically overweight, defined by a body mass-index over 25.   This speed has crept up since 2001, when it was only 1.6 per cent, or one in 60, according to Defense Department data obtained by Military Times. And it’s highest among blacks, women, Hispanics and elderly service members.

In comparison with all the U.S. civilian population, the rate of obese troops is far smaller. Approximately 70% of the adult American population is clinically overweight or obese, according to data in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.
Defense Department health officials introduced the information in the Military Times after requests. They didn’t provide service-specific information to demonstrate the rate of obese troops specifically within the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps.

Even battle troops are getting fatter. On average, those assigned to combat units are not as likely to be obese as the force in the large. In 2001, only about 1 in every 100 service members assigned to battle career fields was flagged to be obese. It’s about one in 15.

This disclosure comes at a time when top Pentagon health officials are the methods for evaluating it as well as forcewide guidelines for body composition criteria. A diagnosis lead to involuntary separation or of obesity may stall a profession, therefore these policies are fundamental to military lifestyle.

Some Pentagon officials say the indications of obesity are not anything to worry about.   Still others state obesity can be a life-and-death issue on the battlefield. Troops that are overweight may not move as quickly in ground combat, which makes them easier targets. And if they’re wounded, it is more challenging for their buddies to pull them.

“If I have to climb up to the top of a mountain in Nuristan, in Afghanistan, and when I have somebody who’s classified as clinically obese, they are possibly going to become a responsibility for me on that patrol,” said Army Command Sgt. Maj. John Troxell, the military’s top noncommissioned officer and the senior enlisted adviser to Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford.  

Troxell said the current force is combat ready, but he believes the obesity trends are troubling   and need careful consideration from older leaders.

“I really don’t think that it’s a clear openness concern right now.   However, I think that it’s something that needs our attention. And we really must look across our solutions in what we’re doing every morning or each day to prepare the people for what could be the worst day of the life,” Troxell said in a recent interview.

Top Pentagon health officials say the growth that is obesity is nothing to worry about. Dr. Terry Adirim, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for health services policy and oversight, indicated there may, in fact, be no real growth in obesity. She called it a “quote-unquote growth” and said that the data might only reflect that military doctors are more mindful of obesity and for this reason flagging it frequently in official health records.

“A doctor who’s now more conscious about fitness and nutrition, they may be diagnosing it over previous decades. … You can’t tell from these numbers exactly what it is that is accounting for all these apparent gains,” Adirim said.
The obesity data offered by the Pentagon is based from medical records, not the operational induce’s until-level analyzing for individual fitness evaluations.   Adirim rejected any concerns about military readiness and emphasized comparisons to the far higher obesity levels for the civilian population. “I’m not concerned about those numbers reflecting issues with openness or fitness,” she said. “In actuality, I feel great that our military service members are well below the general population when it comes to BMI measurement which are obese and obese.”
Military health officials caution against putting too much emphasis on body mass-index scores, which only evaluate an individual’s height and weight to flag those who have unhealthy levels of body fat.

The BMI measurement can be criticized as a blunt instrument that wrongly identifies body contractors with heavy muscle mass as being obese, and misses flabby and unfit people who have been have scrawny body types.  
“you can’t extrapolate directly to state, because a BMI might be higher, that person then is unhealthy and so they will not be prepared for battle,” said Dr. Donald Shell, the Pentagon’s director of Disease Prevention, Disease Management and Population Health Policy and Oversight office.

The hottest Pentagon obesity info confirms concerns raised by “Mission: Readiness,” a nonprofit group of over 600 retired military officers who work to strengthen national security by advocating for kids nationwide to have good schools and great eating habits.   Obesity is atop the group’s agenda. Studies suggest that about 70 percent of American adolescents are not eligible for military support, and failure to meet fitness criteria is a top cause.

“This is about the national security of the United States,” said retired Army Lt. Gen. John Bednarek, who was the greatest ranking American general in Iraq at 2014. “it is a long-term trend and we cannot turn a blind eye.   The main point is that our commanders and senior enlisted leaders need to take a peek at what we’re serving, whether it’s at the [dining facility] or aboard a boat in the mess.   Are we supplying choices that are healthy? Are we supplying fruits and vegetable options? Rather than the very first thing they see in the morning would be that the grill using a 22-grams-of-fat sausage patty?”

New policy in the Functions  

The BMI metric is a vital issue for the Pentagon’s current review of its forcewide body makeup policy, the first time in 14 years which officials have rewritten those rules.
For many troops, the official evaluation of body composition starts with the BMI test to determine if their stature and weight align adequately to suggest they’re healthy. If individual troops show a good BMI, they pass on the body composition evaluation. Should they fail, they must undergo a much more complete “tape test” to estimate actual body fat percent.
The current policy requires service members to maintain body fat levels below a key threshold — 28 percent for men and 36 per cent for girls. And for a long time the Pentagon has demanded the services to apply that having a notoriously low-tech “tape test.” Failure is often listed in official personnel documents and will impact future promotion prospects. Repeated failures could result in involuntary separation.

Many troops are critical of the BMI and the cassette tests, which could punish individuals.

Top health plan to publish a policy later this year that may have a sweeping impact on how the army measures and defines health and fitness.

Overweight Children Are Currently Costing America Billions

The very best way to set up your child for financial success can be a nest egg, a grandparent’s inheritance or a plan.

Or, it might be as simple as keeping them in shape.

A Johns Hopkins University study found overweight men and women, over the span of a lifetime, invest an average of around $30,000 more than healthy people on medical conditions related to obesity, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, heart attacks, heart failure and certain types of cancers.

That’s not to mention that the amount they lose through work, disability and death. Individuals, the analysis found, lose as a consequence of obesity-related conditions, nearly double people of normal weight, that lose in the range of $44,000 and $49,000.

Study leader Dr. Bruce Y. Lee, executive director of the Global Obesity Prevention Center at Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health, argue these numbers are higher for people with obesity.

‘The magnitude is not clear’

Lee and his colleagues sought to put a dollar amount and how society is affected by it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say over a third of U.S. adults are obese as well as 17 percent of children and teens. Lee argued, & ldquo; The magnitude, while the numbers speak volumes. ”

He and his team created simulations of all America’s 31.7 million kids age 8 through 11. They monitored their health day-by-day, such as what they ate and their daily activities. The aim: Determine how a youngster’s degree of physical activity in childhood would impact them during life.

The study found rsquo & that a child;s weight depended they received. Previous research, Lee explained, revealed people who have high body mass indicators in age 18 are most likely to possess a high BMI throughout adulthood.

The study, published in Monday’s Health Affairs, found about 8.1 million of today’s children age 8 through 11 are obese by 2020 if they maintained their existing level of physical action. That would result in $2.8 trillion in additional lost wages and health care costs during their lifetimes.

The researchers calculated exactly what a small exercise regimen could do to the amounts. They found if half of America’s kids age 8 through 11 exercised for 25 minutes, three times every week, there would be 340,000 fewer overweight and obese children, saving $21.9 billion in life lost wages and medical bills. If all kids followed the exact same plan, 1.2 million kids would  prevent becoming obese or overweight, enough to save62.3 billion.

‘Great for the nation’s bottom line’

Lee said the study shows rsquo youth obesity isn &;t just an issue isolated to a couple people. Price burdens to insurance companies are passed on to clients in the form of higher premiums, he explained, and of course an increased tax burden and also the effect on business. Exercise, he explained, is “good for the nation’s bottom line.”

“This shows this is a collective matter,” he said. “These prices will continue that nothing is done. ”

Lee explained the figures in the analysis are underestimated, because they don’t include additional advantages such as progress to muscle, mood and bone density.

It’s signs, Lee asserts, for investment in youth sports leagues and education, college recess. In 2013, the CDC found fewer than half of America&rsquo high school students attended a physical education class in a week. A 2013 Oregon States University study found physical education requirements had increased to 39%.

“As the incidence of childhood obesity grows, so will the value of increasing physical activity,&rdquo. “We will need to be incorporating physical education programs rather than cutting them. We will need to encourage children to be active, to decrease screen time and get them running. It’s important because of their health — as well as the nation’s financial wellbeing. ”

Follow Sean Rossman on Twitter: @SeanRossman